NRL Physicist Awarded NDIA Undersea Warfare Bronze Medal for Achievement in Science

WASHINGTON — Josette Fabre, Ph.D., U.S. Naval Research Laboratory’s Acoustics Stimulation Measurements and Tactics branch head, received the National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA) Bronze Medal on Sept. 22 for technical achievement in undersea warfare during a virtual awards ceremony.

The NDIA Bronze Medal recognizes outstanding individual achievement in science or engineering in the field of undersea warfare.

“I am truly humbled and honored to receive this prestigious award and am grateful to NRL leadership and my colleagues for their role in this achievement,” Fabre said.

Fabre’s scientific focus has been to understand and perfect the performance of sonar systems in complex and variable environments, both oceanic and atmospheric, crucial areas in naval operations.

“Her contributions to computational techniques in ocean acoustic predictions have revolutionized how the Navy determines ocean propagation for passive sonars,” said Bruce Danly, Ph.D., NRL’s director of research. “This could significantly improve the combat effectiveness of undersea warfare for the Navy and Marine Corps.”

Fabre received her Ph.D. in Engineering and Applied Science from the University of New Orleans in 2010. Her body of work is broad and includes ocean confidence and acoustic simulation, sensor performance prediction, and environmental acoustic sensitivity and analysis. She continues research in the area of ocean acoustics and remains a leader in applying data science techniques to physical acoustics challenges for faster assessment of ocean and atmospheric acoustics for the Navy.



About the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

NRL is a scientific and engineering command dedicated to research that drives innovative advances for the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps from the seafloor to space and in the information domain. NRL is located in Washington, D.C. with major field sites in Stennis Space Center, Mississippi; Key West, Florida; Monterey, California, and employs approximately 2,500 civilian scientists, engineers and support personnel.

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