Code 5542, the Computer Security Section, conducts advanced research and development to maintain information superiority of the DoD and US Navy.

In our research, we attempt to bridge the gap between infrastructure protection requirements and the current state of information security. While we respond to the immediate security requirements of the Navy and DoD, we maintain a vision for emerging technologies that would affect the information battle space of the future.

We offer innovative solutions and develop practical approaches to provide secure, trusted, and high-assurance systems for the military. Our information security expertise covers issues ranging from high-level applications and software components to low-level infrastructure and hardware systems. Deliverables range from conceptual system designs and policy statements to prototype implementations and deployable systems. Our major technology areas are:

Security Architecture
  • Develop and implement security architectures for enterprise systems
    • Create and implement federated identity management and access control solutions for data sharing among different organizations
    • Provide data protection mechanisms that satisfy need-to-know
    • Perform vulnerability assessments of systems


    Selected Publications

    2013 Jr. JKirby.  2013.  Specifying Software Behavior for Requirements and Design. Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics, and Informatics. 11(8) 13-1231-2853.pdf (108.65 KB)
    2007 Kirby, Jr J.  2007.  A Unified Specification of Behavior for Requirements and Design. Kirby2007.pdf (1018.32 KB)
    2006 Kirby, Jr J.  2006.  Model-Driven Agile Development of Reactive Multi-Agent Systems. 30th Annual International Computer Software and Applications Conference (COMPSAC 2006). Kirby2006.pdf (319.81 KB)
    2005 Kim A, Luo J, Kang M.  2005.  Security Ontology for Annotating Resources. 4th International Conference on Ontologies, Databases, and Applications of Semantics (ODBASE'05). Kim etal2005.pdf (249.7 KB)
    2005 McDermott J.  2005.  Visual Security Protocol Modeling. New Security Paradigms Workshop (NSPW). McDermott2005.pdf (414.47 KB)
    2005 McDermott J.  2005.  Attack-potential-based survivability modeling for high-consequence systems. 3rd International Information Assurance Workshop. McDermott2005b.pdf (406.04 KB)